5 interesting things (12/07/2015)

Code management tools by AWS – in the last RE:INVENT event (October 2014) Amazon said that this year they are going to focus on new tools for code management and deployment. Now they reveal those tools –

https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/code-management-and-deployment/

Mail received from the closest Oak tree – I find this blig post and the whole process charming. The city of Melbourne created a technology interface to get the citizens more involved in the city life and exciting things happened. I find those interactions between the everyday life and the public sphere as one of the most fascinating challenges of the coming years – making the public sphere more accessible, smart and open.

http://www.citylab.com/tech/2015/07/when-you-give-a-tree-an-email-address/398219/

Toyplot – another python plotting library. Seems to work natively with Numpy. Still quite young – number of different possible charts is limited but I’m it will become more mature in the near future. Beside nice, interactive charts which I’m able to configure to my needs (axes, legend, colors, scale, exporting \ embedding visualizations etc) what I look for in a good plotting package is answer all the different type of charts I need. I don’t want to start juggling between several packages each for a different type. At least on this area there is always a place to grow – heat maps, geo-spatial maps, 3d, etc.

http://toyplot.readthedocs.org/

Python design patterns – I’m Tom and I’m lazy, I admit it. I think I said it before but IMHO a good software developer is a lazy one. One who automates what she can, uses existing tools and packages when available and reuses her own code. This is the main task of design patterns – solve common problems and provide best practices. And also create common language so different developers and stakeholders can communicate. This github repository collects design patterns implementations in Python.

https://github.com/faif/python-patterns

Mining twitter data with Python – a seven posts series by Marco Bonzanini. Goes through the entire process starting with getting twitter access token and ends with data visualization using d3.js and sentiment analysis.

http://marcobonzanini.com/2015/03/02/mining-twitter-data-with-python-part-1/

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